Terry Reid, B.B. King Blues Club

Terry Reid

 

B.B. King Blues Club, December 22, 2005:

 

       Terry Reid comes on stage at 9: 45 P.M. His opening tune is my all-time favorite Terry Reid composition, “Without Expression.” He plays it measured and emphatic, powerful and loose. Piano, percussion and pedal steel guitar accompany him. Terry’s delivery is extremely expressive, emotional and dramatic.

    

Terry Reid

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       “River” is presented slow and staccato. Terry combines ‘skat’ vocals and lead acoustic guitar that is syncopated with strong accents. There is a minor blues aura and again he is quite spirited and brings it right to the edge. The pedal steel by Bob Hoffnar is par excellence. Terry’s delivery is slow, hypnotic, relaxed, creative, sensual and wild.

    

Terry Reid

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       Terry plays a Cole Porter standard, “Every Time We Say Goodbye.” This is a solo vocal performance, with piano. Terry’s delivery is passionate and meaningful. He is dramatic and very personally interpretative. The piano solo is exquisite and dynamically sensitive.

    

Terry Reid

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       “Rich Kid Blues” is a solo vocal performance presentation. Terry’s delivery is inspiring. There is a cut-time passage that is adagio and intoxicating. There is only sparse chord accompaniment. J.D. Souther gave the next song to Terry, “Leavin’ And Gone.” This song is a slow gospel blues. Terry’s delivery is revealing, with no holds barred. His vocal delivery is very ‘Joe Cockerish’ and unusual.

    

Terry Reid

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       “Don’t Worry Baby” is cut time and loosey-goosey. The syncopated accents have the tempo turned upside-down. The tempo varies between time signatures. Terry mixes ‘skat’ vocals with acoustic accompaniment that is very different. “Super Lungs” is from Terry’s second album, in the fall of 1969. It is played with a good driving tempo. Terry’s musical presentation is again forceful and rich. The tempo kicks into double-time for an inventive conga solo.

    

Percussionist

    

Animation/Photos: ©A.J. Alfaro

       “Too Many People In The World” is a melancholy ballad. The song contains a very enchanting chord melody. The lyrics present a powerful message. There is a tremendous pedal steel solo. “Handful Of Dimes” was written in Hong Kong. Terry’s delivery is succinct, staccato, sententious and loose. Bob Hoffnar executes a stunning pedal steel solo that is creative, inventive and caressing.

    

Bob Hoffnar

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       Terry Reid plays a Beatles’ tune, “ Baby It’s You.” He plays it in a totally ‘Terry’ style, with a syncopated delivery and deliberately uneven accents. “Waterloo Sunset” is a subdued and delicate statement, featuring wild guitar strumming. The presentation is uniquely outstanding, with a moving pedal steel solo. Terry Reid has one encore. He finishes with a Christmas song, “It’s Gonna’ Be Christmas Tonight.” His delivery is unique, uncanny, passionate and very expressive.

    

Terry Reid

    

Photo: ©A.J. Alfaro

       I have always admired Terry Reid. I have wondered, at times, where he went to? Terry Reid is alive and well. He is vibrant and uniquely creative. His presentation captivates this audience throughout his entire set. Terry Reid plays extremely close to the edge and generates excitement and intrigue throughout his performance. My wife Kathy has never heard of Terry Reid and is totally impressed. Thank you Terry Reid for coming to The B.B. King Blues Club and giving us a tremendous Christmas present, your music!


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A.J. Alfaro

and.the.beat.goes.on@worldnet.att.net